Leveraging novel TAC technology for multiple
programs and applications.

Product
Target
Discovery
Pre Clinical
Phase 1
Phase 2
Program:TAC101-Claudin18.2 (Auto)
Target:Gastric, PDAC
Program:TAC201-Claudin18.2 (Allo)
Target:Gastric, PDAC
Program:TACX03-GUCY2C (Auto or Allo)
Target:CRC, GEJ, PDAC
Program:TACX04-GPC3
Target:HCC
Program:Next-Generation TAC Programs
Target:TBD

A broadly applicable technology.

Our TAC platform is very versatile and can be readily combined with both existing and novel targets. While our primary focus was initially HER2-expressing cancers, we have added 3 novel targets to our pipeline with INDs targeted to be filed late 2023 or early 2024.

Claudin 18.2 for gastric, PDAC and NSCLC

GUCY2C for colorectal cancer (GEI, PDAC)

GPC3 for liver cancer

Claudin 18.2 for gastric, PDAC and NSCLC

GUCY2C for colorectal cancer (GEI, PDAC)

GPC3 for liver cancer

Armed with our TAC receptor, a T cell may be able to target and attack a cancer cell more effectively than other approaches.

Andy Bader, PhD, CSO

T cell Antigen Coupler (TAC)

Our proprietary TAC platform enables T cells to reach their full anti-cancer potential.

Building on recent findings in immunotherapy, we designed TAC to enhance the natural defense mechanisms of T cells in fighting cancer. TAC is a promising platform for producing therapies that are more effective and safer than existing cell therapies.

Preclinical data reveals the superior anti-cancer properties of TAC-T cells, such as selective tumor recognition and controlled T cell activation leading to complete tumor elimination. Our TAC molecule can be optimized and finetuned toward many different tumor types, increasing the number of patients who may benefit from our TAC-based programs.

Future Development

Versatility across manufacturing approaches.

In addition to our autologous candidate, we are investigating an allogeneic application of TAC-T cells for the treatment of HER2 cancers. Our allogeneic approach employs an “off-the-shelf” cell bank of non-gene edited gamma delta (γδ) T cells, which are a subset of the overall T cell population. These cells are extracted from a healthy donor and genetically engineered with TAC technology.